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The Basics of Tennis Court Construction

Tennis Court Construction

Investing in a Tennis Court Construction is a considerable financial commitment that can yield significant rewards. Proper planning and design of the facility as well as a comprehensive maintenance program will ensure that the tennis court offers years of enjoyment for the entire family and friends.

When it comes to Tennis Court Construction, the first step is selecting the surface type. The four main types are clay courts, grass courts, hard courts, and carpet courts. Each has different characteristics that affect the playing style and requires a different maintenance plan.

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The cost of a tennis court is often determined by the size of the court, which is typically 53 1/3 feet long and 78 feet wide. A smaller court can be constructed but will not accommodate all rules of play. In addition, there are many other items to consider, such as fencing, benches or picnic tables and lighting.

In addition to the cost of the actual structure, other factors that can impact the final costs are the natural state of the site, such as rocks, tree stumps and soil composition that may need to be removed. Moreover, the location of the tennis court should be considered in relation to existing winds. It is best to position the court in a north-south orientation so that players are not blinded by direct sunlight during matches. If this is not possible, several alternatives are available to combat the harsh effects of sunlight. These include windscreens, shading structures and planting trees and shrubs for natural shade.

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